It Takes Two at Socrates Sculpture Park

For the month of August, my inflatable installation It Takes Two will be on view at Socrates Sculpture Park in Astoria, Queens.

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New Work From Publication Studio

Daniele Frazier’s residency at Publication Studio focused on working with host Christin Ripley on various techniques of marbleizing paper. The process consists of floating pigment on the surface of water or other viscous solutions to create aqueous patterns on paper, reminiscent of marble.

Publication Studio and Daniele Frazier are proud to announce a new series of twelve marbleized works all originating from children’s coloring books. In these works, Frazier employed the Japanese suminagashi method and kept in mind the belief that the resulting patterns could be interpreted psychologically as extensions of the artist’s emotions. The water on which the pigment floats is a conduit to the artist’s hand and every vibration. This technique of mark-making repurposed the coloring books as they are known, by superimposing aura-like extensions of the specific characters she chose.

“Traditional suminagashi makers look upon their work as meditation and relief from tension. Every emotion, they say, is registered in the pattern on the paper.”
Gabriele Grunebaum, “Techniques for Marbleizing Paper”
 

Daniele also created a large triptych, collaging posters and marbleizing them with 1-Shot enamel paint. This piece is intended to highlight the design similarities between religious and pop culture imagery. The aspirational, almost religious nature of advertising – with the goal to gain trust in the viewer – is turned on end where the titles have been rearranged into questions, and then further transformed by the psychedelic swirls of paint. Similar to the aura qualities of the coloring book works, these pieces elaborate on the Catholic concept of a ‘resplendor’ or the glow that surrounds a saintly figure.

3Posters

Resplendor, Is A Star Born?, and Do All Dogs Go To Heaven?, 2014
posters mounted on Zerkall Copperplate, enamel paint, methyl cellulose
42 x 30 inches